Wealth Building Scams

admin, 25 June 2013, No comments
Categories: Top7 or 10 Tips
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I have some good news and I have some bad news. First the good news. The number of infomercials on television is decreasing.


Some might say that is great news. But, before you yell hurray, here’s the bad news. They are reincarnating as web sites. Changes the whole picture, doesn’t it?


For those who’ve never seen an infomercial, it is a program-length TV commercial touting easy ways to make money in a variety of ways.


Real estate is probably the most often run program. Others include low-interest government loans or grants to start a new business or go to college.


Then there are the old standby classified advertisement sections in newspapers or magazines promising “big money” business opportunities and/or work-at-home schemes. The companies behind these infomercials and print ads claim that by using their products and services, you can learn how to increase your wealth or start a business from the comfort of your home.


These infomercials and advertisements make it very clear you can make the big bucks only by purchasing their books, audio and video tapes, or computer hardware and software. The materials range in price from less than $100 to several thousand dollars.


To clinch the sale, some promoters include a toll-free telephone consulting service with your purchase and offer a money-back guarantee. The fine print in the guarantee is what gets most people.


Web sites promoting these same type of “opportunities” look like an infomercial. Hype, glitz and promises of big money adorn the screen. On the other hand, contact details, other than ordering information, is scant if existent at all.


On television, these infomercials are designed to look, feel, and sound like real TV programs. The FTC says “they often imitate the format of genuine talk shows or investigative consumer news programs.”


Because they imitate real programs, “the products being sold often are discussed as part of the program and touted by paid “experts,” “moderators,” or “reporters”, according to the FTC. The programs may last for 30 minutes, interrupted by advertisements for the shows products with ordering information.


As in the offline world, online promoters of wealth-building schemes claim that if you follow their methods, you can make substantial sums of money. The means to easy wealth have shifted from real estate and government auctions to web site sales and development, autoresponder sales, gift clubs and bulk email programs.

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